Kilkerran Cask Strength 8 Years Old

Kilkerran 8 cask strength

Regular readers of the site will know that I am a big admirer of Kilkerran whiskies, produced by Glengyle distillery in Campbeltown. Though it’s whiskies are reasonably uncommon and new – the official 12 Year Old was only released late last year – it feels like it’s been around for a good while. Until that release, it has been teasing whisky fans with it’s rather good Work in Progress series.

There has been no marketing behind these whiskies – their reputation has spread simply because the quality is exceptional. (And just about every one of the whiskies I’ve tasted has been exceptional, and the spirit copes very well in different cask types, be it sherry, bourbon or rum.) All the efforts have gone into making something good, rather than spinning a yarn or having a fancy bottle design or flying people out to a product launch so that people say nice things about them. And much of that good effort is down to the fact that it has been overseen by Frank McHardy, the man so influential in making Springbank one of the world’s leading distilleries.

With this, I come to the new Kilkerran Cask Strength 8 Years Old. It has been matured exclusively in bourbon casks, bottled at 56.2% ABV and cost around £45.

Kilkerran Cask Strength 8 Year Old

Kilkerran Cask Strength 8 Years Old Review

Colour: yellow gold.

On the nose: the balance between the sweet vanilla from the American oak and the inherent, malty, peaty, dirtiness of the spirit. Plenty of citrus notes, and marmalade. Golden syrup. That peat becomes slightly diesel-like (in a good way) with cinnamon and cloves. Black tea, earthy. Strawberry jam tarts.

In the mouth: this is where the whisky comes alive. It follows the nose perfectly: yes, vanilla; yes, peat; but that barley-driven maltiness seems to bring the two sides together. Under that is some cream, with peaches, lime juice and mango, but this really starts to hang about in that zone between the maltiness and the peat quite a lot.

Conclusions

I’ll admit, not the best Kilkerran – but it is still very good indeed. I think part of the issue is that I come to anything Kilkerran releases and expect whatever it is to be the world’s best whisky, which this isn’t. It’s actually just really good fun, and still a class above many other releases this year. Full of character, complexity and vitality. I think if you’re still to try Kilkerran’s whiskies, then the Kilkerran 12 Year Old remains for me the best starting point.

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