Taste: Brora 32 Year Old Limited Edition

Distillery: Brora
Age: 32 years
Distilled: 1978
Bottled: 2011
Limited Edition of: 1500 (that’s what the label says, some reports suggest 1404 only)
Strength: 54.7%
Cask: American Oak & refill European Oak casks
Additional: 10th release in the annual Diageo series

The intro
This bottle will be part of the Angels’ Share concept but as I had the chance to sample it prior to purchase, I felt there was no better starting point for some tasting notes. Yes, finally, I’m going to get around to adding my own thoughts on some releases when I can. My thoughts on the packaging, distillery, presentation etc. will follow as part of Angels’ Share.

Perhaps it was being outside at the Clynelish distillery with its smells of production across the environment that limited my sense of smell. On the sample dram I wasn’t getting much from it. Yes, some peat, crushed almonds, vanilla, a fruity and vibrant edge. Nothing screaming jump in.

Now the Brora springs into life. Tremendous depth, spice flushed with a sweetness laced with honey perhaps, maybe pineapple? Then again is the Clynelish characteristic wax starting to develop here? A fantastic depth of flavours all scrambling to be noticed. There is a slight peaty edge; apparently older Brora was far more full on with this emphasis. Here it forms an interesting back note. A real contrast to the Clynenish bottles we know today.

A long pleasant, citrus and refreshing finish, even as I was a few miles away debating whether to have a cleansing drink of water, or continue to savour the sweet, mellow after taste which remains strong. I opted to keep the taste.

I’ve not had much experience with malts of this age. Normally these giants are out with my price range. I’m a teen or occasionally a twenties guy – not through choice I should add! This Brora 32 year old is worth the outlay delivering something truly memorable and complex. I had high hopes for this distillery and this release, and now I can appreciate why Brora is so highly regarded.


JJ was originally the man known as Whisky Rover. He comes from a family well versed in whisky, particularly Bushmills. Being based in Scotland means that he’s able to reach out and enjoy a wealth of distillery trips and whiskies, although it’s more than likely you’ll find him in the Edinburgh Cadenhead's shop.

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