Confession; I am addicted to whisky, but not to drinking it. When we think of alcohol and addiction, we usually assume substance abuse. Adam and Dora have previously written excellent articles on this topic, exploring the physical and mental health aspects of alcohol dependence amongst whisky enthusiasts. Interestingly, they both also mention a particular trait to which they attribute some blame; the fear of missing out, or FOMO for short. I think this plays an even greater role in some other aspects of addiction, even more widespread, not limited to alcohol, and too often ignored.

As far as I am aware, we are unique amongst animals in our need to collect objects that have no bearing on our survival. Apart from a select few who reject worldly possessions, most of us have an almost endless list of life’s trappings to which we impart sentimental value. Perhaps it is because our identities and personal connections are built around memories, which these objects embody. Through one or other of our senses, they elicit an emotional response as they transport us to a particular moment in time. In turn, this connection creates feelings of satisfaction and wellbeing.

As human beings, we are also bestowed with some degree of drive and focus necessary for survival. These traits are usually encouraged and essential for setting and acquiring goals. Unchecked or misdirected, however, drive and focus can become obsession and compulsion. An important balance must be found. There are many common examples where an otherwise healthy drive can spiral out of control. Most of us will know someone who began their career as naturally ambitious, before becoming consumed by it, to the point that we call them a ‘workaholic’. A healthy lifestyle and diet are also something that is encouraged, and yet many people develop extreme eating habits or obsessive exercise regimes. I was one of them. Luckily for me, an obsessive exercise regime has another more accepted and respected name; professional sport.

Similar to any activity, our innate need to collect means that any one of our possessions can become the unhealthy outlet for a corrupted drive and focus; a collection is born. The key ingredient is variation. This is true of whisky also; it is an ever-changing liquid. During its journey from raw ingredients, to cask, to the last drop in your bottle, whisky undergoes constant change through a variety of processes, with countless variables that will always remain outside of our control. When we taste it, we can only do so as it appears to our subjective senses in one particular moment in time. There is something magical about that. No matter how much we taste, or how much we learn about its creation, there will always be more that demands our attention. It is a never-ending journey of discovery and knowledge.

This boundless variation is the reason FOMO exists and thrives. It is the added ingredient that drives a humble collection into a full-blown addiction. FOMO poses the same question to us all; what if you never come across something like this again? It manifests itself in those who collect whisky in various ways. For those struggling with alcohol intake, it adds fuel to the fire; an obsession and compulsion to taste everything grows into uncontrolled and spiralling overindulgence. For collectors of wall bottles, it drives an obsession to collect certain brands, sequences or batches of whisky.

I have become addicted to discovering the next best whisky I have not yet tasted. I am driven to uncover the unknown, tick off flavour profiles or releases that pique my interest, all to have that eureka moment when lightning strikes and I stumble across a whisky that stops me in my tracks. I am then compelled to hunt down and buy several, because of that same question, because I am afraid that I might never come across something like it again. As a result, an enjoyable casual hobby has developed alarmingly quickly into an all-consuming addiction. As with any unhealthy relationship, it is only with the benefit of hindsight that you can really appreciate the many warning signs. Originally, I promised myself, and my wife, that I would stick to just one cupboard; I threw away all the tubes when I needed to make more space. Then, I simply changed the parameters to two cupboards. Much to my shame, there are now bottles lurking in the corner of the living room, as well as several waiting for me in four other countries. I realise now that chasing bottles, and the shame and guilt associated with each purchase, was increasing my stress and affecting my sleep; it has begun to have a profound effect on my mental health.

We must all take ownership of our decisions and actions; however, the whisky industry has to accept some responsibility for the part it plays. Whisky is essentially marketed and sold through FOMO: limited or batch releases, package design and wording, exclusive deals and discounts, embellished tasting notes. For one reason or another we are told that a particular whisky is unique and a must-have. We are destined to fail, and yet we cannot blame commercial enterprises for trying to survive and turn a profit in a crowded market. We should hold accountable, however, those companies who fail to employ morally and socially responsible marketing practices. There are many of us who aim to do just that, from the countless amateur whisky enthusiasts on social media, to the established online platforms such as this one. Unfortunately, I cannot help but think that we are caught up in the vicious cycle also. Our thoughts and words will influence purchasing habits, no matter the size of our audiences, or how well-intentioned we are. We can only hope that this is through helping people to make informed decisions, rather than triggering FOMO, though sadly I know that this is often not the case.

Awareness and understanding are essential; however, the question remains of how to proceed. The only permanent solution is to walk away completely; stop drinking it, stop buying it. Instead, I am hoping to find a way back to a healthy enjoyment of whisky. Time will tell if this is naive. Though several suggestions for practical solutions have been made, I am not confident that they will work for me. My worry with a one-in-one-out type policy is that it will encourage me to drink more, even subconsciously. While I am certain that I do not have a dependence on alcohol, there is a natural fear that this is the next step. The most common suggestion is bottle splitting, which has only exacerbated the problem. Buying splits increases the variety I can taste, the chance that lighting strikes and the number of bottles I am compelled to buy as a result. By offering splits, I am also able to use others’ interest to further legitimise and excuse purchases. There is arguably some benefit to those trying to reduce intake, however, even here I am uncertain. Purchasing in smaller containers does not necessarily equate to drinking less. On the contrary, buying more frequently in smaller amounts could actually make it easier to lose track of the overall quantity and ignore the problem. At best, these practical solutions only seem to fight the fire, rather than put it out. At worst, they provide excuses to hide behind while doing more harm than good.

It is only through writing this piece that I have taken the time to reflect on the qualities of whisky that draw me in. Understanding these qualities has also led me to realise that they hold the key to both the problem and the solution. As is true of so many things in life, they are two sides of the same coin, and the only distinction is a matter of perception. FOMO has corrupted my perception and appreciation of the variation in whisky. It has caused me to fixate on the individual moments, trying to preserve them with compulsive buying and collecting. Perversely, the obsessive need to collect them all means that most sit forgotten and neglected as I chase the next. I have lost sight of the bigger picture. During my whisky journey I will come across the good, the bad, the ugly and the great, however, they will all just be passing moments in a timeline of continuous exploration and discovery unique to me; this is something to celebrate in its own right. Much like whisky itself, the journey is so much more than the sum of its parts.

Altering one’s perception and changing bad habits is always easier said than done. I know that I cannot change overnight and there are almost daily temptations to contend with. Though I have reservations about practical solutions, I have decided to implement some firefighting measures to help strengthen my resolve while I buy myself the time to re-evaluate my relationship with whisky and how I interact with it. I will not be purchasing any bottles, splits or tastings during the month of March, and possibly longer; I need to prove to myself that I can fight the urge when something tempting shows up. When my wallet does reopen for business, I will be forcing myself to be more selective in my purchases by sticking to a strict monthly budget.

Time will tell whether this works, although so far, I have not faltered. I am optimistic. Only a few weeks in and I already feel more relaxed, as though a heavyweight is lifting. I am embarrassed that I allowed myself to lose control in the first place, however, I also relish the challenge and feeling of slowly regaining that control. I am feeling less of an urge each time a new release pops up, or a friend recommends something ‘incredible’. As the obsessive need for the next best thing is waning, I am enjoying what I already have open more. I am also rediscovering some of those forgotten whiskies at the back of the cupboard and I look forward to enjoying them patiently when their time comes to be opened, as well as the moments in time they take me back to.

  1. John
    John says:

    Great article! One thing I just realized is my being jaded and pessimistic about the industry has let me worry less or feel less FOMO. Mostly because I’ve realized that brands have learned to take advantage of us, just like you said.

    Cheers

  2. TheWhiskySleuth
    TheWhiskySleuth says:

    That’s an interesting way to look at it, almost like a form of self preservation and protection. If we learn to view all these ‘special’ releases with more objective skepticism, then hopefully we will also be discerning about where we direct our attention and money.

    1. John
      John says:

      Yes. Self preservation of my bank account and liver. Like you mention above, we all try to set limits with how much we have in our collection. I think being more… discerning lessens or prevents us from chore drinking which is unhealthy and not fun.

      1. TheWhiskySleuth
        TheWhiskySleuth says:

        That is definitely something that i was worried could happen, slipping into a habit of just trawling through whiskies to get to the next one. Thankfully my quantities haven’t changed through this, but it has resulted in this compulsive hoarding instead. Hopefully the cycle is now broken and the swollen cupboards will start to subside.

  3. Avatar
    Greg B. says:

    I have learned to largely avoid this after some expensive and disappointing lessons. I fortunately drink only a handful of drams each week and have gotten away from spending excessively in search of the next great whisky experience. Part of that is the paucity of offerings available in my area, but that has served to teach me what to no longer do, oddly enough. Buying overpriced NAS whiskies because I believed the distillery would maintain their same level of quality and key taste characteristics (they didn’t); buying non-official bottlings from sources other than the distillery that produced it in hopes it would offer some previously-unknown insight into the product (it didn’t); buying expensive new offerings from a reputable producer thinking that a 2x or 3x price premium over their usual product would be reflected in the tasting experience (it wasn’t); believing whisky bloggers and writers about the fabulous new whisky I should not miss (I no longer care). Fortunately I have never been attracted by carved wood boxes or crystal special-edition bottles for fairly pedestrian whisky. It really comes down to a matter of trust of those producing, selling and promoting the stuff, and far too often over the last few years that trust has been misplaced. In the end, it has proved to be a valuable lesson.

    1. TheWhiskySleuth
      TheWhiskySleuth says:

      Thank you for your response, Greg. It sounds as though you have taken a similar approach to John above, to take the whisky industry with a healthy dose of skepticism in order to protect yourself. I hope you are still able to uncover and enjoy a few whisky gems regardless. Lowering quality is a common theme these days, though I am strangely glass half full on this topic. I think there are still many great affordable options out there, something I plan to focus my attention on more going forward.

      1. Avatar
        Greg B. says:

        I have circled back to a few whiskies I had not bought for a while, having tried some of their more expensive variations. Now I find Bowmore 12 surprisingly good value for example, whereas I had previously been disappointed when I had bought their more expensive offerings. I find Glen Garioch 12 and their NAS Founders Reserve exceedingly good value as well. Some of that may well be due to anomalies in their pricing locally but I will take such things as I find them. I also find Arran makes products that seem to appeal to me at price points that are aligned with their value in my mind. So you are correct in noting there are good choices out there.

        1. TheWhiskySleuth
          TheWhiskySleuth says:

          It’s funny you mention Arran, I was agreeing with someone the other day when we agreed that we’ve yet to taste a bad offering from them. For me the trifecta of cadenhead, Springbank and Kilkerran all offer excellent quality and value.

    2. Avatar
      Matthew says:

      Agree in some part on not trusting that a 3x premium in price equates to a 3x more enjoyable whisky, as that has not been the case for me either.

      However, as for avoiding independent bottlers, I guess I have had a different experience than you have, as I’ve found that many IB offerings are a much better value than the OB bottles from the distillery. They tend to be cheaper for the same age and also typically undiluted (so you can water it down yourself and get extra whisky vs the OB, or enjoy at full strength).

      1. TheWhiskySleuth
        TheWhiskySleuth says:

        Hi Matthew, I agree absolutely that indies often offer better value, though these days that is not necessarily the case. But with regards the price here on the topic of FOMO, they are definitely some of the worst culprits. Generally bottled as single casks and so extremely limited as a result, they are much more likely to elicit that knee jerk must have reaction. In my experience in any case, however I see it in many others also.

  4. Avatar
    Richard says:

    I was struggling with the same issue of buying more than I was ever going to drink. But I’ve broken the habit over the last six months as it’s clear to me that prices will come down in coming years as inventory catches up with demand. Now is the time to drink our collections. We will be able to buy better stuff for less money for the rest of the decade.

    1. TheWhiskySleuth
      TheWhiskySleuth says:

      Hi Richard. An interesting side effect of this compulsive collecting amongst whisky enthusiasts is that it could well be contributing to a false economy. The distilleries are reacting to constantly increasing demand, and I wonder how great a part we hoarders play in that. If more of us stop buying more than we could possibly hope to drink ourselves, then demand and price will surely drop also.

  5. Avatar
    Nik says:

    A very pertinent article. Like I had mentioned on the Insta post that both drinking and buying are slippery slopes, for health and wealth. I will admit that I too have a “collection” but not by design. There is a natural “whisky distancing” imposed by geography. I live in Mumbai, India but buy almost exclusively in the UK and a bit of EU. I don’t have ready access to what I buy. Unfortunately(or fortunately) no parcel arrives at my doorstep. Most of my bottles are stored in the UK. So now imagine what is worse? The ability to buy and drink or in my case to buy much more than I could possibly drink without ever having direct access to the bottles? With the exception of Kilkerran and the odd Longrow I don’t ever chase an OB. There are enough and more IBs out there who provide great value and accessibility without having to break your bank. We must not get manipulated by marketing and always vote with your wallet.

    1. TheWhiskySleuth
      TheWhiskySleuth says:

      As you say Nik, there are countless fantastic indie releases these days. Sadly their exclusivity is exactly the sort of thing to trigger fomo. Limited bottles by nature, they often sell out within minutes, which means you have to act impulsively if you want to score one. It is also true that they can offer excellent value for money, but that isn’t much help if you are compelled to buy many of them. All that being said I hope you get to taste some of your purchases soon!

  6. Alex
    Alex says:

    Great article, it’s like you went in my head and knew what I was thinking!

    I find it hard to to avoid what I think is a passionate hobby of mine becoming an obsession, with potentially negative effects on myself (mainly on the wallet). But then I think “fuck it you only live once” and press that “buy now” button for a new bottle. But I do have to rein it in.

    What helps me is to think I literally couldn’t try every bottle ever, so to focus on what I really want to try. Which is finding that dream 10/10 for less than 50 quid.

    I love the thought provoking articles which are published here from time to time, where no whisky was actually sampled. It’s great to see, and read.

    Cheers!
    Alex

  7. TheWhiskySleuth
    TheWhiskySleuth says:

    Hi Alex, I can relate to that too. I’ll buy it now, make up for it later. Before you know it the costs start racking up. That was definitely part of the issue, the high of the chase and purchase, the guilt afterwards. I too need to get back to realising we can’t taste and own them all, just enjoy them in passing for what they are and move on. I hope you find that unicorn bottle, just don’t buy too many of them when you do!

  8. Avatar
    Craig says:

    Great points well made…
    I think it’s been like this for quite some time now, and exasperated by online facilities, retailers, auctioneers etc… All battling, and of course we have new distillers etc doing the same, then there’s crowdfunding so that someone can buy a cask…

    1. TheWhiskySleuth
      TheWhiskySleuth says:

      Hi Craig, all very valid, it’s a bit overwhelming out there as were bombarded with information on why everything at the moment is so spectacular and demands our attention. Not mention ourselves and our friends as we egg each other on with tales of what great drams we’ve been enjoying. The whole system currently is really set up to lure in as many sales as possible. Hopefully more people will start to buck the trend, which might also have the beneficial side effect of driving prices down too!

      1. John
        John says:

        Hm… to offer a different perspective, having enough technical knowledge regarding the spirits can prevent being overwhelmed by the abundance of choices. It’s easier to suss out which products will be to your liking just by looking at the production process.

        1. TheWhiskySleuth
          TheWhiskySleuth says:

          This is certainly something that gets better with time/experience, but it’s still difficult to fight a compulsive urge when it comes. A recent temptation during my self imposed ban were two new heavily sherried adlephis. I can just tell from the colour that they are going to be objectively too sherried for me, but it doesn’t stop people messaging each other to say how amazing it is, or the colour starts to do funny things to one’s brain. Thankfully I resisted. Actually I think Jason will be reviewing those two at some point.

  9. Avatar
    Tikbalang says:

    Good topic, and very well said, something that probably many whiskyfans encounter.
    There is however another factor that wasn’t really mentioned in this article that also plays a role in this phenomena in my opinion.
    The current whiskymarket, what is going on since the last couple of years.
    It becomes harder to find good quality whisky with a decent age (statement) for reasonable prices, oftentimes good official bottlings with age are replaced by NAS whisky with mediocre quality. Many new whiskies released are NAS or at least very young (undermatured) with high strength to compensate it a bit with some more punch.
    So what people do when one of their favourite malts is going to be discontinued, and replaced by something of much lower quality ? Many will stock up several bottles for the future to enjoy.
    When you really like a certain whisky, the thought in these times is, it will either be discontinued, the quality will go down later, or the price will go up a lot, so you might consider stocking up quite a few bottles.
    I guess many (including myself) stocked up some bottles of the old Glendronach 15 revival for example, because where can you still buy such quality sherried whisky for that price ?
    And the fact that whisky (any strong drinks) doens’t really expire makes it all possible to do.
    And indeed, we all want to do this to ensure we have those moments of pure joy in the future to come.

    1. TheWhiskySleuth
      TheWhiskySleuth says:

      Thank you for your reply. Albeit for slightly different reasons, it certainly sounds as though a collection has formed based on that same question posed by fomo, what if this is as good as it gets? As I mentioned, for me this has compelled me buy several back ups when I taste something that really speaks to me, a bit like the glendronach for you, were worried that we’ll never find something like it again. I think the trick is to change perception. It’s just whisky after all, there will be many other good ones and bad ones, and a few great ones for sure. They’ll be different, but that’s something to celebrate too.

    1. TheWhiskySleuth
      TheWhiskySleuth says:

      Thanks for sharing Victor! Just had a quick read through, I’m glad to see it has created so much discussion. Wherever one stands on this, open discussion is really the most important part. I strongly agree with those comments speaking to a budget as an ideal solution. My moratorium on buying is now up and it has been much easier already to forgo certain purchases as I am holding onto the money and looking ahead. I also really like the idea someone had of a virtual to buy list. I’ve kept a vague mental note of things but actually I might use that, jot down whiskies, prices and websites to help create an even more selective environment. Then budget dependent some might make the cut. The only comment I have to disagree with is that of walking away. I stand by it as the ultimate solution. The solution to something like alcoholism, or any drug abuse, is certainly not to keep partaking and hopefully learn some self control along the way. The solution is to distance yourself as much as possible from any triggers. Buyers addiction might not have the same physical ill effects, nevertheless I think the same argument stands. Naturally, I am hoping it never gets to that point.

  10. Avatar
    Octavio Stevaux says:

    Hi there Mr. Sleuth,

    Great piece! I like to consider myself as a Psychonaut, traveling though different realities from time to time, and one of this travels lead me to Satanism. Satanism is as a humanist philosophy as you can get – the LaVeyan, os Modern, branch. They don’t believe in the devil or demons, just put them as different archetypes of the human psyche.

    One of the main points in this reality is that you start really seeing humans as just another animal, and you start paying attention to other animals. You find out that Ants herd aphids with tranquilisers in their footsteps, monkeys pay for sex, dolphins can be disgusting beings creating rape groups of females, like the joy division in nazi camps and… that other animals like to compulsively collect things.

    Most rodents do, some species of birds are famous for collecting and we, humans, have that compulsion too, nothing to be ashamed of. Bowebirds have a fetish for anything blue, for instance. Of course biologists will say they do that in order to have higher chances of copulating, but that’s biologists for you. I remember an article on wrinkled fingers, and how that showed natural selection benefited those pré sapiens homos that had that ability. I can’t stop picturing cro magnon dad shouting to cro magnon son “hurry kid, grab as many glass marbles as you can from the bottom of this lake! We need them to survive!” And thus, today we all have finger and toes that wrinkle when we spend more than 10 minutes in the shower.

    I knew I was different when the kids who went home looked at my comics collection and asked “wow.. you keep them all?”. Well, I thought that was what you were supposed to do. You buy a comic book, you read it, you keep it!

    I knew I had a problem when, years later, while going through the monthly cleaning, I caught myself thinking “uhmmm I don’t have a second copy of this first edition!”

    FOMO, new names for old things. I still thing FOMO is just that old feeling, you know? “Everybody is having sex, but me” (even when you are having sex). When we start to talk about obsessive behaviour like collecting I think it’s just the collector bug bitting us.

    I think that obsession per se is not a bad thing, like they say “obsession makes my life worse but my work better!” the point is figuring out what exactly is your “work”.

    Your collection have to define you as opposite as turning you into its slave. If your were to pic up, among all your bottles, 5 that define you, with ones would you choose?

  11. TheWhiskySleuth
    TheWhiskySleuth says:

    Hi Octavio, thank you for your reply!

    I am no evolutionary biologist, and my expertise in the natural sphere is limited to David Attenborough documentaries, so I am in no position to comment on Nazi ants or dolphin sex parties. I would argue that from what little I’ve gathered from Sir David, most of the natural collection phenomena, such as the bowerbird you mentioned, is inherent to an animal’s survival. The bowerbird must impress a mate in order to reproduce. Squirrels and other rodents must hoard and collect food to survive winter. Humans collecting habits I would say are not generally orientated towards survival.

    I do think it is worth considering whether some ancient hunter gatherer aspects have remained with us through time, like the diving example you give. In many ways we are programmed to try and find use for things, something that my grandparents generation became acutely aware of during war time rationing. It is an instinct that came naturally to most people, and perhaps is partly why we collect bits and bobs over the years. Who knows when something might become useful? It is conceivable that this can spill over into collections of objects becoming uncontrolled.

    I particularly like your idea that our negative traits are almost like demons in disguise. I certainly feel that FOMO is almost personified, like an evil little gremlin sitting on our shoulders, tempting us. I also think, however, that it can be dangerous to try and distance ourselves from blame. We must ultimately take responsibility for our actions and habits, and we cannot hide behind a fatalistic approach that removes responsibility or self control.

    Lastly, if there were a fire in my home I honestly do think I would grab a single bottle, my thoughts would be to get my family out safely. It is only whisky after all. If I was told I could only keep one bottle from my collection for the rest of my life, it would currently be the Ballechin 15 bottled for The Whisky Exchange.

    1. Avatar
      Octavio Stevaux says:

      Hi there Mr. Sleuth,

      Great piece! I like to consider myself as a Psychonaut, traveling though different realities from time to time, and one of this travels lead me to Satanism. Satanism is as a humanist philosophy as you can get – the LaVeyan, os Modern, branch. They don’t believe in the devil or demons, just put them as different archetypes of the human psyche.

      One of the main points in this reality is that you start really seeing humans as just another animal, and you start paying attention to other animals. You find out that Ants herd aphids with tranquilisers in their footsteps, monkeys pay for sex, dolphins can be disgusting beings creating rape groups of females, like the joy division in nazi camps and… that other animals like to compulsively collect things.

      Most rodents do, some species of birds are famous for collecting and we, humans, have that compulsion too, nothing to be ashamed of. Bowebirds have a fetish for anything blue, for instance. Of course biologists will say they do that in order to have higher chances of copulating, but that’s biologists for you. I remember an article on wrinkled fingers, and how that showed natural selection benefited those pré sapiens homos that had that ability. I can’t stop picturing cro magnon dad shouting to cro magnon son “hurry kid, grab as many glass marbles as you can from the bottom of this lake! We need them to survive!” And thus, today we all have finger and toes that wrinkle when we spend more than 10 minutes in the shower.

      I knew I was different when the kids who went home looked at my comics collection and asked “wow.. you keep them all?”. Well, I thought that was what you were supposed to do. You buy a comic book, you read it, you keep it!

      I knew I had a problem when, years later, while going through the monthly cleaning, I caught myself thinking “uhmmm I don’t have a second copy of this first edition!”

      FOMO, new names for old things. I still thing FOMO is just that old feeling, you know? “Everybody is having sex, but me” (even when you are having sex). When we start to talk about obsessive behaviour like collecting I think it’s just the collector bug bitting us.

      I think that obsession per se is not a bad thing, like they say “obsession makes my life worse but my work better!” the point is figuring out what exactly is your “work”.

      Your collection have to define you as opposite as turning you into its slave. If your were to pic up, among all your bottles, 5 that define you, with ones would you choose?

      Great writing asks for thoughtful replies 🙂

      Attenborough produces great pieces, the problem, if we even see it as problems is the evolutionary logic. Same people – I like to include myself among them – like to say that the human ego took three historic blows, the proverbial kick in the nuts:

      1- Copernicus proving we don’t stand at the center of the universe

      2- Freud showing our conscious self is the smallest thing happening at our psyche

      3- Darwin proposing we weren’t created as a special and beloved race by an almighty creator

      Curiously humans love to be in the spotlight, so we keep creating stories do make us special. The bowerbird compulsion to impress a mate to reproduce is that different from our compulsion to dress nice, have a Ferrari and look sharp to impress a mate? Look at my collection of blue stuff, babe – says the bowerbird – look how I can spend time and effort to collect stuff not essential to my immediate survival! Wanna come in to my nest and have a banana Daikiri?

      At this point I’m a supporter of Charles Fort hypotheses when he says that when we talk about the survival of the fittest we are not talking about the survival os the fittest, or the smartest, or the toughest… we are merely talking about the survival of the survivor. Why did it survive? It beats us, but when can make stories about it 🙂

      But enough of biology, if I keep going I’ll start to throw some math in this and the answer will become unbearable, unless anyone want’s to go to a new unbearable awesome level!!!

      Loved the gremlin in the shoulder, I think quite the same.

      I really don’t think obsession is really bad, it can make us unpopular when we start do discuss that which fire us, but that is not really bad. Everybody loves Sherlock Holmes, Dr. House and Batman, right?

      The problem is when obsession becomes compulsion! We must never forget that the chicken is the way the egg found out to produce more eggs. When we step into compulsion – whether collecting or consuming our collection – we are in sh*tland!

      Guess I will leave you be, I tend to start writing and only stopping when I realize I’m going two or three days without any food. Hahaha just joking, but you can get the idea.

      P.s. Uhmmmm.. ok, you just got a new bottle in my list 🙂

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